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dc.contributor.authorParviainen, Annika Jenni Johana 
dc.contributor.authorVázquez Arías, Antón
dc.contributor.authorMartín Peinado, Francisco 
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-14T11:34:57Z
dc.date.available2022-09-14T11:34:57Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationParviainen, A., Vázquez-Arias, A., Arrebola, J.P., Martín-Peinado, F.J. (2022). Mineralogical association and geochemistry of potentially toxic elements in urban soils under the influence of mining. Catena 217, 106517. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2022.106517es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10481/76691
dc.description.abstractPolluted soil is an important source of exposure to potentially toxic elements (PTEs) for humans, especially in urban areas. We studied the fate of PTEs in the total (<2 mm) and fine (<50 μm) fractions of urban soils in playgrounds, passing areas, and vacant lots of the historic mining village of Minas de Riotinto in SW Spain. The mineralogical and chemical observations included analysis by scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis of Al, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, As, Cd, Ba, Tl, and Pb after acid digestion by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry and Sb by X-ray fluorescence. The total and fine fractions of natural and mixed (consisting of natural soils and aggregate pavements) urban soils have significantly higher concentrations of sulfide-associated PTEs (Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sb, and Pb) and Ba in comparison to the aggregate pavements. Most of the natural and mixed urban soils surpass the regulatory levels set by the regional Government for As and Pb to declare a soil as contaminated. This work highlights the mineralogical source of PTEs in the urban soils. Primary geogenic sulfide minerals are prone to oxidation promoting dissolution of PTEs and acid generation in the future. Additionally, for the first time, we have described arsenian plumbojarosite and beudantite in urban soils which are abundant secondary phases under the circumneutral pH conditions, effectively retaining As and Pb. Inhalable small PTE-rich particles (<10 μm) are present in many soils in playgrounds and garden areas potentially posing health risk to residents upon dusting and resuspension in the air.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCatena 217;106517
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectArsenian plumbojarositees_ES
dc.subjectBeudantitees_ES
dc.subjectSoil geochemistryes_ES
dc.subjectEnvironmental mineralogyes_ES
dc.subjectMining areaes_ES
dc.titleMineralogical association and geochemistry of potentially toxic elements in urban soils under the influence of mininges_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2022.106517
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional