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dc.contributor.authorMelchor Ferrer, Elías 
dc.contributor.authorDavia Rodríguez, María Ángeles
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-27T08:49:10Z
dc.date.available2022-06-27T08:49:10Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10481/75674
dc.description.abstractThis paper introduces a computer application, based on The Alphabet Game, designed to assist students of all disciplines understand the key academic concepts used in their respective fields, with specific application to economics and the study of national accounts. This approach offers a valuable contribution, in view of the difficulties often encountered in presenting key national accounting concepts in a dynamic and appealing manner. Due to the flexibility of the application, it can also be adapted to other fields of knowledge requiring the use of specialized or technical concepts. To assess the game’s impact on enhancing learning, students of national accounts in economics were asked to assess their participation by means of an attitudinal survey focusing on motivation, quality of learning, and the effective use of time. The survey was completed by 60 students from two Spanish universities. The overall assessment of the game was strongly correlated with its contribution to the memorization of concepts, usefulness, and enjoy ability. The second evaluation assessed the impact of the game through measurement of its effect on academic performance, with students´ academic records related to the scores from both individual and group gameplay. The assessment was done using a multivariate analysis consisting of a set of semi-logarithmic regression models in which the exam score was the dependent variable and a combination of game results according to the version played (individual, group, or both) were the explanatory variables. All combinations indicated that the individual game is much more strongly related to overall academic performance than the group score. However, to better assess the game, a control group, homogeneous samples, or pre- and post-tests should be used. Finally, to improve the game’s impact on learning, it can be used as a compulsory scoring activity, or a badge system could be implemented. Nonetheless, this tool should only be understood as an inextricable part of other assessment and learning activities.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipBiblioteca de la Universidad de Granadaes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSpringeres_ES
dc.rightsAtribución 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectGamificaciónes_ES
dc.subjectLearning strategieses_ES
dc.subjectNational accounts learninges_ES
dc.titleComputer games and the study of terminology: An application to national accountses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10639-022-11138-w
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES


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Atribución 3.0 España
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Atribución 3.0 España