Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMatta, Michèle
dc.contributor.authorSánchez Pérez, María José 
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-29T11:02:04Z
dc.date.available2021-04-29T11:02:04Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-30
dc.identifier.citationMatta, M., Huybrechts, I., Biessy, C. et al. Dietary intake of trans fatty acids and breast cancer risk in 9 European countries. BMC Med 19, 81 (2021). [https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-021-01952-3]es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10481/68195
dc.descriptionThe coordination of EPIC is financially supported by the European Commission (DG-SANCO) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The national cohorts are supported by Danish Cancer Society (Denmark); Ligue Contre le Cancer, Institut Gustave Roussy, Mutuelle Générale de l’Education Nationale, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) (France); German Cancer Aid, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Deutsche Krebshilfe, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum and Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Germany); the Hellenic Health Foundation (Greece); Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro-AIRC-Italy and National Research Council (Italy); Dutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports (VWS), Netherlands Cancer Registry (NKR), LK Research Funds, Dutch Prevention Funds, Dutch ZON (Zorg Onderzoek Nederland), World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF); ERC-2009-AdG 232997 and Nordforsk, Nordic Centre of Excellence programme on Food, Nutrition and Health (Norway); Health Research Fund (FIS), PI13/00061 to Granada; PI13/01162 to EPIC-Murcia, Regional Governments of Andalucía, Asturias, Basque Country, Murcia and Navarra, and the Catalan Institute of Oncology (Spain); Swedish Cancer Society, Swedish Research Council and County Councils of Skåne and Västerbotten (Sweden); Cancer Research UK (14136 to EPIC-Norfolk; C570/A16491 and C8221/A19170 to EPIC-Oxford), Medical Research Council (1000143 to EPICNorfolk, MR/M012190/1 to EPIC-Oxford) (UK). We thank the Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, and the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM)-Bilthoven, the Netherlands, for their contribution and ongoing support to the EPIC Study.es_ES
dc.descriptionFor information on how to submit an application for gaining access to EPIC data and/or biospecimens, please follow the instructions at http://epic.iarc.fr/ access/index.php.es_ES
dc.descriptionInformed consent was given by all study participants, and ethical approval for the entire EPIC cohort was obtained from the Institutional Review Board of the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, under protocol numbers SC/24/4 and SC/24/6, as well as from local ethics committees in the participating countries.es_ES
dc.descriptionThe authors thank the EPIC participants and staff for their valuable contribution to this research and Bertrand Hemon (International Agency for Research on Cancer) for managing the data for the EPIC project.es_ES
dc.description.abstractBackground Trans fatty acids (TFAs) have been hypothesised to influence breast cancer risk. However, relatively few prospective studies have examined this relationship, and well-powered analyses according to hormone receptor-defined molecular subtypes, menopausal status, and body size have rarely been conducted. Methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), we investigated the associations between dietary intakes of TFAs (industrial trans fatty acids [ITFAs] and ruminant trans fatty acids [RTFAs]) and breast cancer risk among 318,607 women. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for other breast cancer risk factors. Results After a median follow-up of 8.1 years, 13,241 breast cancer cases occurred. In the multivariable-adjusted model, higher total ITFA intake was associated with elevated breast cancer risk (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.23; P trend = 0.001). A similar positive association was found between intake of elaidic acid, the predominant ITFA, and breast cancer risk (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.23; P trend = 0.001). Intake of total RTFAs was also associated with higher breast cancer risk (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.17; P trend = 0.015). For individual RTFAs, we found positive associations with breast cancer risk for dietary intakes of two strongly correlated fatty acids (Spearman correlation r = 0.77), conjugated linoleic acid (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20; P trend = 0.001) and palmitelaidic acid (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.16; P trend = 0.028). Similar associations were found for total ITFAs and RTFAs with breast cancer risk according to menopausal status, body mass index, and breast cancer subtypes. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that higher dietary intakes of ITFAs, in particular elaidic acid, are associated with elevated breast cancer risk. Due to the high correlation between conjugated linoleic acid and palmitelaidic acid, we were unable to disentangle the positive associations found for these fatty acids with breast cancer risk. Further mechanistic studies are needed to identify biological pathways that may underlie these associations.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Commission European Commission Joint Research Centrees_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Agency for Research on Canceres_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipDanish Cancer Societyes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipLigue Contre le Cancer (France)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInstitut Gustave Roussy (France)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipMutuelle Generale de l'Education Nationale (France)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInstitut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (Inserm)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Krebshilfees_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipGerman Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) (Germany)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipFederal Ministry of Education & Research (BMBF)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Krebshilfees_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (Germany)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipFederal Ministry of Education & Research (BMBF)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipHellenic Health Foundation (Greece)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipAssociazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro (AIRC)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipConsiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipDutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports (VWS)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNetherlands Cancer Registry (NKR)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipLK Research Fundses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipDutch Prevention Fundses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNetherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipWorld Cancer Research Fund International (WCRF)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto de Salud Carlos III PI13/00061 PI13/01162es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipJunta de Andaluciaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipCatalan Institute of Oncology (Spain)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipSwedish Cancer Society Swedish Research Counciles_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipCounty Council of Skane (Sweden)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipCounty Council of Vasterbotten (Sweden)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipCancer Research UK 14136 C570/A16491 C8221/A19170es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUK Research & Innovation (UKRI) Medical Research Council UK (MRC) 1000143 MR/M012190/1es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipJulius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrechtes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM)-Bilthoven, the Netherlandses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNordforsk, Nordic Centre of Excellence programme on Food, Nutrition and Health (Norway)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipRegional Government of Asturias (Spain)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipRegional Government of Basque Country (Spain)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipRegional Government of Murcia (Spain)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipRegional Government of Navarra (Spain)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipJunta de Andaluciaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipERC-2009-AdG 232997es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherBioMedes_ES
dc.rightsAtribución 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectIndustrial trans fatty acidses_ES
dc.subjectRuminant trans fatty acidses_ES
dc.subjectBreast canceres_ES
dc.subjectDiet es_ES
dc.titleDietary intake of trans fatty acids and breast cancer risk in 9 European countrieses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12916-021-01952-3
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Atribución 3.0 España
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Atribución 3.0 España