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dc.contributor.authorHenriksson, Pontus
dc.contributor.authorAltmäe, Signe
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-20T12:51:00Z
dc.date.available2021-01-20T12:51:00Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-09
dc.identifier.citationHenriksson, P., Lentini, A., Altmäe, S., Brodin, D., Müller, P., Forsum, E., ... & Löf, M. (2020). DNA methylation in infants with low and high body fatness. BMC genomics, 21(1), 1-9. [doi:10.1186/s12864-020-07169-7]es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10481/65852
dc.descriptionThe authors gratefully thank the parents and children that participated in the PATHOS study.es_ES
dc.description.abstractBackground: Birth weight is determined by the interplay between infant genetics and the intrauterine environment and is associated with several health outcomes in later life. Many studies have reported an association between birth weight and DNA methylation in infants and suggest that altered epigenetics may underlie birthweight-associated health outcomes. However, birth weight is a relatively nonspecific measure of fetal growth and consists of fat mass and fat-free mass which may have different effects on health outcomes which motivates studies of infant body composition and DNA methylation. Here, we combined genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of buccal cells from 47 full-term one-week old infants with accurate measurements of infant fat mass and fat-free mass using air-displacement plethysmography. Results: No significant association was found between DNA methylation in infant buccal cells and infant body composition. Moreover, no association between infant DNA methylation and parental body composition or indicators of maternal glucose metabolism were found. Conclusions: Despite accurate measures of body composition, we did not identify any associations between infant body fatness and DNA methylation. These results are consistent with recent studies that generally have identified only weak associations between DNA methylation and birthweight. Although our results should be confirmed by additional larger studies, our findings may suggest that differences in DNA methylation between individuals with low and high body fatness may be established later in childhood.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipSwedish Research Council Formases_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipSwedish Research Council 2015-03495es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipSwedish Cancer Society CAN 2017/625es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipSpanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness (MINE CO)es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Union (EU) RYC-2016-21199 ENDORE SAF2017-87526es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipLinkoping University Libraryes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipBo and Vera Ax:son Johnsons Foundationes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSpringer Naturees_ES
dc.rightsAtribución 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.titleDNA methylation in infants with low and high body fatnesses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12864-020-07169-7
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES


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Atribución 3.0 España
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Atribución 3.0 España