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dc.contributor.authorMartín-Peciña, María
dc.contributor.authorRuiz-Ruano, Francisco J.
dc.contributor.authorMartínez Camacho, Juan Pedro 
dc.contributor.authorDodsworth, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-21T07:58:42Z
dc.date.available2020-05-21T07:58:42Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-25
dc.identifier.citationMaría Martín-Peciña, Francisco J Ruiz-Ruano, Juan Pedro M Camacho, Steven Dodsworth, Phylogenetic signal of genomic repeat abundances can be distorted by random homoplasy: a case study from hominid primates, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, Volume 185, Issue 3, March 2019, Pages 543–554, [https://doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zly077]es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10481/62166
dc.description.abstractThe genomic abundance of different types of repetitive DNA elements contains a phylogenetic signal useful for inferring the evolutionary history of different groups of organisms. Here we test the reliability of this approach using the Hominidae family of primates, whose consensus phylogeny is well accepted. We used the software RepeatExplorer to identify the different repetitive DNA clusters and quantify their abundances. With these data, we performed phylogenetic analyses by maximum parsimony, including one, two or three individuals per species, technical replicates, and including or discarding two clusters of repetitive elements (i.e. a satellite DNA and an endogenous retrovirus) that generated random homoplasy, because they were abundant in Pan and Gorilla but almost absent in Homo and Pongo. The only phylogenetic tree congruent with the accepted topology for hominids, thus coinciding with that obtained from the mitogenomes of the same individuals, was the one built after filtering out the libraries for the two homoplasious clusters and using three individuals per species. Our results suggest some caution in the use of repeat abundance for phylogenetic studies, because some element abundances are homoplasious, which severely distorts the phylogenetic signal owing to their differential amplification among evolutionary lineages.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipM.M.P was supported by a FPU fellowship (FPU13/01553) from the Spanish Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte. F.J.R.R. and J.P.M.C. were supported by the Spanish Secretaría de Estado de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación (CGL2015- 70750-P), including FEDER funds, and F.J.R.R. was also supported by a Junta de Andalucía fellowship. S.D. was supported by a NERC studentship.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherOxford University Presses_ES
dc.rightsAtribución 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectHominidaees_ES
dc.subjectHomoplasyes_ES
dc.subjectInter-individual variationes_ES
dc.subjectPhylogeneticses_ES
dc.subjectRepetitive DNAes_ES
dc.titlePhylogenetic signal of genomic repeat abundances can be distorted by random homoplasy: a case study from hominid primateses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/zoolinnean/zly077


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Atribución 3.0 España
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Atribución 3.0 España