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dc.contributor.authorSalazar Tortosa, Diego Francisco
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Rhodes, Lindsay
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-15T11:11:30Z
dc.date.available2020-04-15T11:11:30Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-31
dc.identifier.citationDiego Salazar-Tortosa, Lindsay Fernández-Rhodes, Obesity and climate adaptation, Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health, Volume 2019, Issue 1, 2019, Pages 104–105, [https://doi.org/10.1093/emph/eoz016]es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10481/61236
dc.description.abstractObesity is a pandemic that has increased exponentially during the past decades due in large part to recent changes in lifestyle and food delivery systems. Yet, there is still a great variability in the burden of obesity across ancestral populations. For example, in the USA prevalence estimates of adult obesity vary from 13 to 48% in Asian Americans and African Americans.1 Such variable observations within the same obesogenic environment have motivated a wide array of inquiry into the genetic, epigenetic and social determinants of obesity, and their complex interactions with modern lifestyles and food systems.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherOxford University Presses_ES
dc.rightsAtribución 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectObesity es_ES
dc.subjectClimate es_ES
dc.titleObesity and climate adaptationes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/emph/eoz016


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Atribución 3.0 España
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