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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10481/37330

Title: Whatever you write seriously is taken as a joke, and whatever you mean as a joke is taken seriously: A study of Carnival and nonsense in Lewis Carroll's Sylvie and Bruno and Sylvie and Bruno concluded
Authors: Duarte Ferrer, Manuel
Direction: Andrés Cuevas, Isabel María
Rodríguez-Salas, Gerardo
Collaborator: Universidad de Granada. Departamento de Filologías Inglesa y Alemana
Issue Date: 11-Sep-2015
Submitted Date: 2014
Abstract: The main aim of this thesis is to analyze carnivalesque features and images underlying Lewis Carroll’s works Sylvie and Bruno (1889) and Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (1893). To this end, I have considered the paradigm of Mikhail Bakhtin’s work Rabelais and His World (1960), taking into account the definition about carnival and the carnivalized literature he provides. Hence, elements such as billingsgate, the celebration of death or acts of uncrowning will be considered. I also comment on children’s literature in the Victorian period and mainly nonsense English literature which proliferated during this era, where some features of the carnivalesque described by Bakthin can be observed.
Keywords: Carroll, Lewis, 1832-1898
Bakhtin, Mikhail Mikhailovich, 1895-1975
Carnival
Children's literature
English literature
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10481/37330
Rights : Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License
Appears in Collections:Proyectos Fin de Máster

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